Category: True Fitness Training – Nutrition

The Key Word in Athlete Performance Training

When you think of speed training what word comes to mind?  Speed? Agility? Quickness? Sure, all of those would be perfect, but the key word in athlete performance training is… Efficiency!  I have been training athletes since 1997 and from professional to youth, they all come to True Athlete Performance and me for the same thing – for us to make them a better athlete.  The best way to do that is to make them more Efficient

To improve efficiency in speed we focus on:

  • Form and Technique: Proper form helps to ensure no wasted movement.
  • Stride Frequency: Improved frequency increases the number of strides in a given distance.
  • Stride Length: Improved length increases the distance covered each stride.
  • Strength: Increasing strength will help to ensure maximum power output from the key muscle groups in sprinting form.
  • Core Stabilization: A strong and stable core will help to provide the proper foundation for increasing speed.

To improve efficiency in agility we focus on:

  • Form and Technique: Proper form helps to ensure no wasted movement.
  • Programmed Agility: Drills help to ensure and emphasize proper form.
  • Random Agility: Drills that help to develop the proper sport-specific agility needed for sport.
  • Flexibility: Improved flexibility will help to ensure proper range of motion in cutting properly.
  • Core Stabilization: A strong and stable core will help to provide the proper foundation for increasing speed.

To improve efficiency in quickness we focus on:

  • Form and Technique: Proper form helps to ensure no wasted movement.
  • Arms:  The faster the arms move, the faster the feet move.
  • Reaction Time: The better you react the quicker you respond to any athletic movement.
  • Ground time: The quicker you get to the ground and the quicker you get off the ground the quicker you are.
  • Core Stabilization: A strong and stable core will help to provide the proper foundation for increasing speed.

In all, improving efficiency in athletic movements will help to guarantee improved play on field or court.  Remember, we don’t just train players – we train athletes! 

For more information on this or any of Rob’s TrueAP Blogs, contact Rob at rrose@trueap.com.

Trueap.com – “Where True Athletes Train.”

Muscle Soreness in Athletes

Question:  Why am I so sore?

Sore muscles –  this is a painful thing at times for our clients, but a great sign for our trainers. 

In order to build and strengthen muscle, we must tear the muscle fiber.  Not a huge tear, such a muscle strain: (A strain is an injury to a muscle or tendon in which the muscle fibers tear as a result of overstretching. Strains are also colloquially known as pulled muscles. The equivalent injury to a ligament is a sprain). But what we call a micro-tear. 

When muscles are asked to do more work than they are accustomed to, they suffer minor ruptures or micro-tears. You’ll feel these micro-tears as muscle soreness. 

So, if you are properly training, you should be sore.  It is this soreness that helps us to build the muscles and improve strength and power.

Why am I more sore the two days after my workout?

This is very common with most exercise programs and it relates to what we just discussed.  Those micro-tears do happen right after a workout, but you might not feel them repairing until up to 24 days after the workout. 

This is better known as D.O.M.S.  Delayed Onset of Muscle Soreness.

Delayed onset muscle soreness was first described in 1902 by Theodore Hough, who concluded that this kind of soreness is “fundamentally the result of ruptures within the muscle.” (1) 

That tissue damage may relate most directly to soreness, as it may increase the sensitivity of the pain receptors, and cause pain with stretching, activity and touch.  The delayed onset of the soreness may also occur because the inflammatory response: (Inflammation is a protective attempt by the organism to remove the injurious stimuli and to initiate the healing process.)(2)

Another common explanation is the presence of Lactic Acid built up in the muscle.  This is considered unlikely to be correct since lactic acid is removed from the muscle within an hour of intense exercise, and cannot therefore cause the soreness which normally begins about a day later. (1)

So, what do we do to help relieve this soreness?

  1. Cool down properly after exercise – Static stretch – hold for AT LEAST 30 seconds!!
  2. Ice down after an intense workout.
    1. When I was a Student Athletic Trainer at GMU, I recommended that athletes sit in an “Ice Bath” for about 10 minutes after a hard workout or practice. 
    2. Since most of us do not have access to an Ice Bath, just stick with ice packs.
  3. Drink a lot of water. 
    1. Muscle is comprised of mostly water (70%)
    2. It is recommended that you drink a min. of eight (8) – 8-ounce glasses of water each day.
  4. Sleep
  5. Exercise the next day
    1. Exercise alleviates the symptoms of soreness.
    2. Light warm-up or jog should suffice
    3. More intense workouts are beneficial too.

If you want some other ideas on how to alleviate soreness, email me at rrose@trueap.com.

Also, check out our NEW store!!  We have a few manuals covering the topic of proper warm-up and flexibility, which will help reduce soreness and improve performance.  Visit www.trueap.com/store – ALL products are 25% off for a limited time only!

HAVE A QUESTION FOR ROB ROSE, PRESIDENT OF TRUEAP?

  1. Write it down below this
  2. Email it to rrose@trueap.com.

Don’t forget to look for my video blog on this topic.  I will go through some great exercise techniques and exercises for you to try.

Thanks,

Rob Rose

Summer Recipes

Two keys to any fitness program are exercise and nutrition. Here are some tasty, healthy summer time recipes for you to try!

Grilled Chicken Breast with Cucumber and Pepper Relish

Grilled Chicken Breast with Cucumber and Pepper Relish

Total Cooking time – 1 hour 30 minutes

Makes 4 servings

 

Ingredients

1 cucumber – peeled, seeded and chopped

1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley

1/8 cup chopped red onion

1/2 cup chopped yellow bell pepper

1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

1/8 teaspoon chili powder

2 tablespoons olive oil

4 skinless, boneless chicken breasts

Directions

In a medium bowl, prepare the relish by mixing together the cucumber, parsley, chopped onion, bell pepper, and red pepper flakes. Set aside. In a small bowl, mix the cumin and chili powder with the olive oil. Rub the mixture onto the chicken, and place in a shallow dish. Marinate in the refrigerator at least 1 hour. Prepare the grill for medium heat. Lightly oil the grill grate. Grill chicken 8 minutes per side, or until juices run clear. Serve with cucumber relish.

Nutritional Values per Serving

Calories: 205 | Total Fat: 9.8g | Cholesterol: 67mg
Pineapple and Banana Smoothie

Pineapple and Banana Smoothie

Total Cooking Time – 3 minutes

Makes 3 serving

 

Ingredients

16 ice cubes

1/4 fresh pineapple – peeled, cored and cubed

1 large banana, cut into chunks

1 cup pineapple or apple juice

Directions

Place ice cubes, pineapple, banana, and pineapple juice into the bowl of a blender. Puree on high until smooth.

Nutritional Values per Serving  Calories: 313 | Total Fat: 0.9g | Cholesterol: 0mg

Chipotle Strawberry Cocktails

Makes 6 servings

Fresh strawberries are kicked up with zesty green onion and chipotle pepper and covered in a tasty lime coating that brings it all together.

Ingredients

3 cups sliced fresh strawberries

1 avocado, cut into small dice

1 green onion, minced

1 tbsp snipped cilantro

1/2 tbsp chopped chipotle pepper in adobo sauce

1 tsp lime juice

1 tbsp olive oil

1/4 tsp salt

1/2 tsp lime zest

Garnish, toasted pine nuts

Directions

In a large bowl, combine all the ingredients until well mixed. Divide among 6 martini or wide mouth champagne glasses. Garnish each with nuts.

 

Mandarin Orange Honey-Roasted Cashew Salad

 

Makes 4-6 servings

Iceberg and romaine lettuces combine with celery, green onion, mandarin oranges and purchased honey-roasted cashews in this salad.

Ingredients

Dressing:

1/4 cup olive oil

2 Tablespoons white vinegar

2 Tablespoons sugar

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon pepper

1 Tablespoon chopped fresh parsley

1/2 teaspoon red pepper sauce (or to taste)

Salad:

1 small head iceberg lettuce, torn

1 small head romaine lettuce, torn

1 cup diced celery

2 green onions, chopped

1 can (11 oz) mandarin oranges, drained

1/2 cup honey-roasted cashews

Directions

Mix dressing ingredients in small bowl. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use. In large salad bowl, combine lettuces, celery, green onion, oranges, and cashews. Pour chilled salad dressing over salad and toss. Serve immediately.

Roasted Sweet Potato and Green Onion Salad

 

Total Cooking Time

1 hour

Makes 8 servings

 

Ingredients

4 medium sweet potatoes (about 1 pound each)

1 bunch green onions (white bulb and 3 inches of green)

1/2 cup olive oil, plus extra for brushing the potatoes and green onions

1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

1/4 cup cider vinegar

1/4 cup balsamic vinegar

1 tablespoon honey

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

1/4 cup coarsely chopped flat-leaf parsley

Directions

Brush the potatoes and green onions with olive oil. Roast the potatoes until tender. Roast the green onions until softened. When cool enough to handle, cut the potatoes into 1-inch cubes and finely chop the green onions. In a large bowl, whisk together the remaining 1/2 cup olive oil, the mustard, vinegars, and honey, and season with salt and pepper. Add the potatoes, green onions and parsley and mix until the potatoes are coated with the dressing. Season to taste with additional salt and pepper.